LocalSYR

Cold case haunts a Madison County family

Gunshots rang out 20 years ago tonight – ending the lives of great-grandparents Jessie and Carl Stabb while they watched television in their Wampsville home.
Wampsville (WSYR-TV) - Gunshots rang out 20 years ago tonight – ending the lives of great-grandparents Jessie and Carl Stabb while they watched television in their Wampsville home.

Their daughter, Joan Bodah, is still waiting for justice.

"I go by now and I look in the yard for dad to be out in the yard,” she said.

The grisly details of her parents deaths emerged during the police investigation. Clues suggest the Stabbs were shot through a window during the evening of May 10, 1993. Their son called 911 around 10:25 p.m., reporting that he'd discovered the bodies.

"My mom watched my dad die and when she saw them point the gun at her, she must have lifted up her hand to block the bullet,” Veronica June said.

The case remains unsolved. Over the years, police have followed more than 500 leads in the case. But, there was never a clear motive.

"It was clear that it was a calculated act, but it was also a cowardly one,” said New York State Police Capt. Mark Lincoln. "Nothing close to that has happened in that same area since and what makes the most sense to us is that it was somebody that had a close relationship with the two victims.”

Investigators believe some evidence at the scene may have been left behind intentionally, to mislead police.

"My mom was sitting on one side, my dad was sitting on the other and there was only one hole. They had to have been in the house,” June said.

Carl and Jessie Stabb had ten children and numerous grandchildren. With time, memories fade, but the pain of the murders has not eased.

"It's hell. You wake up everyday and think about them. You go to sleep at night thinking about them. I mean, you don't know. There's got to be a reason. I want to know why,” Bodah said.

State Police say they have DNA evidence in the case, but they’re hoping someone will come forward with new information.

Anyone who can help police should call (315) 366-6000.

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