Trump calls KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists 'repugnant'

President remained silent for nearly 48-hours

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Donald Trump directly condemned white supremacists and neo-Nazis in a statement from the White House Monday afternoon.

"Racism is evil -- and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans," Trump said in response to the attacks in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend.

"Those who spread violence in the name of bigotry strike at the very core of America," Trump said.

"As a candidate I promised to restore law and order to our country and our federal law enforcement agencies are following through on that pledge," Trump said. "We will spare no resource in fighting so that every American child can grow up free from violence and fear. We will defend and protect the sacred rights of all Americans and we will work together so that every citizen in this blessed land is free to follow their dreams, in their hearts, and to express the love and joy in our souls."

Democrats and Republicans have excoriated Trump for his unwillingness to condemn the groups behind the violent protests that left one woman dead who was allegedly hit by a car driven by a man with ties to white supremacy groups.

After blaming the violence "on many sides" Saturday, Trump stayed silent for close to 48 hours, letting his trademark bluntness and campaign pledges to call terrorism what it is succumb to silence and vagueness.

Trump was asked by reporters after he spoke why he waited so long to condemn these hate groups by name and did not respond.

Trump's comments came as he took a short break from his 17-day long working vacation in New York and New Jersey with a trip to the White House. He initially returned to Washington to meet with top administration officials and sign a presidential memorandum directing his US Trade Representative to determine whether an investigation is needed into China's laws and policies related to trade and intellectual property.

Trump led his brief statement by touting his return to Washington and positive economic news. One aide said the President wanted to give the "full picture" of how he sees things -- not only wanting to do Charlottesville in a vacuum.

This was the White House's latest attempt to clarify Trump's comments from Saturday.

An unnamed White House official said Sunday that "of course" the President condemns "white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazi and all extremist groups," but declined to explain why the President wasn't saying it himself.

Trump also remained mum on Twitter, declining to send a single tweet of his own Sunday, only the fourth in his 207 days as president that Trump has gone a full day without tweeting a message of his own.

Trump did, however, use Twitter on Monday to push his political message and settle a score: He slammed Ken Frazier, the CEO of Merck Pharma, who resigned from Trump's manufacturing council over his failure to condemn white supremacists.

"Now that Ken Frazier of Merck Pharma has resigned from President's Manufacturing Council, he will have more time to LOWER RIPOFF DRUG PRICES," Trump tweeted.

Frazier, one of the nation's top African-American CEOs, has spent considerable time at the White House with Trump before he resigned his position.

This story is breaking and will be updated.


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