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Pilot in deadly crash was making his first landing at San Francisco in a Boeing 777

The National Transportation Safety Board has recovered both flight data recorders and spent Sunday collecting critical clues to figure out how this tragedy happened.
Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport, FAA spokesman says.
Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport, FAA spokesman says.
San Francisco (CNN/WSYR-TV) -  The NTSB is investigating a plane crash in San Francisco.

On Saturday, a Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crashed while landing on a flight from Seoul, South Korea.

The pilot of the plane was making his first landing with a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International Airport, Asiana Airlines said.

Although he had flown to San Francisco on multiple occasions, it was his first time landing a Boeing 777 at the airport.

The pilot had flown from Seoul to the city several times between 1999 and 2004, the airline said.

He has also clocked 43 hours flying a Boeing 777.

The National Transportation Safety Board has recovered both flight data recorders and spent Sunday collecting critical clues to figure out how this tragedy happened.

The cockpit voice recorder appears to show the pilots tried to abort the landing less than two seconds before the plane crashed on the runway according to the NTSB.

The plane's voice and flight data recorders show that the flight was coming in too slow and too low and that the pilots appear to have increased speed seven seconds before impact.

A stall warning sounded four seconds before the crash, and the crew then made an internal decision "to initiate a go-around 1.5 seconds to impact," said Deborah Hersman, the head of the NTSB.

Asiana Airlines has identified the two girls who died in Saturday's tragic crash as 16-year-old students Wang Linjia and Ye Mengyuan. 

They were visiting from China.

Somehow, 305 others survived, but nearly 200 of them were injured when the Boeing 777 crashed while landing at the California airport.

Doctors have seen a wide range of injuries after the crash, including "large amounts of abdominal injuries, a huge amount of spine fractures, some of which include paralysis and head trauma," said Dr. Margaret Knudson, chief of surgery at San Francisco General Hospital. Doctors have also treated "patients who had severe road rash, suggesting that they were dragged," she said.

Survivors and witnesses say the plane was flying too low as it approached the end of the runway.

They say a fireball erupted after the airliner hit the runway hard around 11:30 a.m. Saturday, rocked back and forth, spun around, shearing off the plane's tail. 

Scores of passengers and crew climbed out -- some jumping, others sliding down evacuation chutes as flames and smoke billowed from the aircraft's windows.

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