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Seneca County likes its odds on gaining a large-scale casino

The maneuvering is already in full swing to grab one of the four upstate casinos approved by voters last week.
Seneca County (WSYR-TV) – The maneuvering is already in full swing to grab one of the four upstate casinos approved by voters last week.

Seneca County’s Board of Supervisors’ chair is coming out in full support of luring one there.

Bob Hayssen says the area down Route 318 has plenty of land for a developer to build a gaming facility, adding to what’s already nearby.

Although it’s just an empty field now, the chair of Seneca County’s Board of Supervisors says he can see the lights and hear the sounds of a destination style casino one day.

"We have probably the most wineries in New York State and that's just growing every year. We have museums within an hour away, golf courses, a lot of things to do here, it just adds up, we have the Outlet Mall,” said Seneca County Board of Supervisors Chair Bob Hayssen.

Hayssen says the casino will benefit from having two Thruway exits within seven miles of each other.

“A large scale casino would create jobs, a lot of jobs here and a lot of businesses would spin off of that and it's even going to help the hotels and motels that are four miles away down the road. They might be a little scared at first but they all aren't going to stay at the resort, there's going to be people coming in and out of here for weekends,” Hayssen said.

Hayssen says there are over 2 million people to draw from in the surrounding area.

It has water lines already and sewer plans to be extended.

Hayssen says he would expect a Seneca County casino to likely face a serious fight from Tioga Downs, a racino that wants to add table games.

The racino is in the same part of New York State cleared for a casino as Seneca County.

Voters in Seneca County approved Proposition 1 by a 55 to 45 percent margin.

Central New York will not get a new casino because of an exclusivity agreement the governor signed with the Oneida Nation.

The Oneidas will pay the state $50 million a year as part of the deal.

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