Upstate University Hospital demonstrates heatstroke dangers

Local News

As we prepare for the heat index to hike up over 100, we can’t emphasize enough the dangers the hot weather could have. NewsChannel 9’s Josh martin heads to Upstate for a unique and up-close look at the symptoms of heat exhaustion.

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (WSYR-TV) — This guy is far from a dummy. It breathes and has a pulse. It is a training tool used to simulate symptoms and illnesses, like heat exhaustion and stroke.

With the weather we’re expecting, it could you be you experiencing those symptoms if you aren’t careful.

“The concern about that is people spend too much time outside or they are a part of the vulnerable part of the population and they end up going into heat exhaustion, or worst-case scenario, heat stroke,” said Stan Goettel, Advanced Life-Support Systems Manager at SUNY Upstate.

It is important to stay hydrated and recognize how much time outside is too much.

Goettel said, “One of the symptoms of heat exhaustion is that you get chills even out in the heat and then you start to shake and when you go from heat exhaustion to heat stroke, frequently they stop sweating they may be a little diaphoretic, but if they go into full-blown seizures you know the brain is swelling and you know it is a life-threatening event.”

To beat the heat, you have to be prepared. The people at Upstate hope everyone takes the heat seriously and regulates their time outside.

We talk a lot about taking care of ourselves, but we can’t forget about our pets. You should keep them inside and never leave them in your vehicle. The people at Upstate say the temperature in your car can rise 20 degrees in about 10 minutes in the heat and humidity we’re expecting.


For more local news, follow Josh Martin on Twitter @JoshMartinNC9

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